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of victory -- >> barack obama has been reelected the 44th president. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles under. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> of natural disasters. >> it is like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> they are saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> of political fumbles. >> i have five seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the reelection of president barack obama. as "time"'s magazine cover states -- the president was person of the year -- barack obama will be the first democrat in more than 75 years to win a majority of the popular vote twice. mitt romney has to be asking himself, given the magnitude of the president's problems and the great numbers of americans who believe that the country wa
because he's not worried about the general election. he's worried about a primary election like a rand paul. >> and the other -- >> by the way, he is from rand paul's state. it's possible. >> he is. the other thing to keep in mind is boehner's speakership vote is up on january 3rd. >> but you -- everybody keeps saying that, but to vote against the speaker who is the caucus nominee, let's face it, he is the nominee of the republican party. to not vote for the speaker is a major act of betrayal on the part of any member of the congress. you have to that day -- >> the idea if he goes and forces through a tax increase, they could express their dissatisfaction, their unhappiness, by not voting for him for speaker. it takes a majority of the full house for him to get elected. a couple dozen of those guys -- >> i know this stuff. >> for the sake of the viewers. >> but for the sake of me, there used to be a sense of doing the right thing, and by the time you're the party nominee for speaker, you vote for the party nominee for speaker. you don't just screw around with this thing because that wo
. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
this is part of the story of the 2012 election and maybe the never several elections. sam wang had an accurate forecasting model. he sent us a cartoon rather than a chart. he weighed in on the attacks being launched as people like us who are using data to talk about the election. it says quote, breaking, to surprise a sun dit the best system for determining which of two things is wiser. we posted these charts and a bunch of others. i'll tweet a link to them. that does it for tonight. and now it is time for the last word. have a good night. >> the house of representatives. has known for over a year that it has a monday night deadline for avoiding the fiscal cliff. so when are they going to start working on that? sunday night. >> stalemate gridlock joorks this is what the holidays look like. >> there is so much manure around here. >> this isn't school house rock. >> the fiscal cliff. whatever. >> there is barely 00 hours. >> the last minute was before christmas. >> what is going on here? is. >> how come there is no sense of urgency. >> the entire house coming back sunday night. >> ho
in the general election with the latinos, who he got blown out and provided a huge margin in the swing states. >> that is a good point, my point is, of course, the anonymous video operator, who captured the 47%, which is why we happen to have the tape. why it happened to be ready. now, the best move of 2012. what was the best move of 2012? >> this is really hard, because some part of me as a political junky thinks the best move is the crazy thing. and for that, i would give it to mitt romney actually moving across the stage and grabbing rick perry, this kind of physical debate style he also had that revealed him to be crazy and not driven by the same things that most humans are driven by. but sort of the competitive work force bought. but i think at tend of the day e keep going back to the 47% -- >> it is everything. >> the release of that. and the timing of that changed the contours of the race, forever. >> and we don't really know who is responsible for that timing. krytal, the best move. >> the best move, goes to the point about immigration, the president, when he gave a press conference s
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
security as well. i want republicans to realize that they were elected to do the will of the people. not just the three% or whatever. they all need to understand that we are all affected by their thinking -- the president won the election, right? host: thank you for the call. i want to take you through some of the effects, if we do go off the fiscal cliff, if congress takes no action. this is the chart from the new york times of what will happen immediately and in the next couple months. in terms of the immediate tax increases, the payroll tax rise of 62% from four 0.2% and workers first $113,000 of income. capital gains, qualified dividend's, and estate and gift taxes are subject to higher taxes. higher earners face new taxes under the health care law. within the next couple glock -- a couple of months, the bush era tax cuts that have been debated over -- the bush-era tax cuts on income expire december 31, workers will not fill the impact until the treasury releases new withholding instructions. alternative minimum tax -- the charred talks about spending cuts, immediate and in the
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
for election. everybody else is pretty much locked in whether we go over the cliff or not. is it thelma and louuisuise or laverne and shirley? they all place their bets a year-and-a-half ago. the election decided it. host: thank you for the call. bill has this point. we are down to the wire in terms of negotiations. jackie is joining us from georgia. caller: good morning. i cannot believe i got through. i have been trying for so long. host: thank you for being persistent. caller: the guy from the newspaper is wrong. we are not stupid. we know what is going on. i am 71 years old. i'm so worried about going down and being a third-world country. john boehner has to get his act together. he is not worried about anything. and the tea party -- give me a break. they are not worried about anything but taking us down. i still cannot believe i got to talk to you guys. thank you for listening. if obama could run again, i would vote for him again. he wants to do something. the republicans do not. if a republican was in the white house, there would not be any worry about paying for sandy, unemployme
ten moments of an election year is like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. there are an impossible number of possibilities. there are the moments when catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business, you didn't build that. >> i like being able to fire people who provide services to me. >> when cast members stole the spotlight. >> i'm an american woman who us contraception. let's start there. >> almost like an etch a sketch, you can shake it up and we start all over again. >> a fair number of moments ranging from ridiculous to explicable. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romnesia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> so many moments so much nonsense. but there were moments that shook up the race or made history and made our top ten list. >> it was seen at the time as a proxy race for november. wisconsin's republican governor scott walker in a showdown with organized labor over budget cuts and collective bargaining power. turns out the end result was no bellwether for the presidential race. walker w
't understand how these people cannot do their jobs that they're elected to. so i'm wondering what's your take on what's going on in washington? you're sitting in washington. >> right. the at least we have bipartisan agreement it's all nuts, right? everyone agrees this is ridiculous and in spite of what they say, they've been talking about it for months and years and there was ample talk about what a framework should be through the election, which wasn't that long ago. there's plenty of debate. to tie the two stories we have been talking wiabout together, there was a colin powerful doctrine that general schwartzkopf executed so well in the first gulf war. which was have an exit strategy and using overwhelming force. this congress had an exit strategy. they had the idea of overwhelming force, and they set themselves these limits. if they got through this deadline the pain would be so great on themself -- this is self-imposed -- they would find a way out. they have not executed their own strategy and been able to vote for their own leadership. what you have in washington just to take a step back
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside fro
any doubt in my mind. there are looking at the election of 2014 and 2006 to more than the people. thank you for your time. pfft host: good morning to you, elmer. what is your level of optimism heading into 2013? caller: i am kind of scared. the statement i went to bed, why do we not get in contact with george bush. i think he should be in here on the deal because it was him and that got us in this position we are in. he cannot even tolerate position said they have going on with our congress. if the people out here for us to be taking care of, if they have enough money to take over to another country the way they demonstrate, that is what we are in this position that we are in. i think we should get in contact with george bush and see if he can get us out of this. host: here is a piece in "the washington post." if there is a photo of the first couple greeting military personnel. this is the president remained largely out of sight golfing and spending time with his family. he left washington late on friday. a little progress has been made on the cliff talks, but at least the talkin
on it for us. for more on this let's bring in the editor of "campaigns & elections" magazine, shane deapril. campaigns and elections might be appropriate here because some say there is a lot of political posturing going on. you have said the feeling in washington it might actually be better to go over the cliff and come back and negotiate. why? >> yeah. now, this is of course purely political campaign calculation here, tossing aside the nation's fiscal health frankly. for both side i think there is good argument to be made for congressional leaders, democratic leaders and republican leaders in particular, there may be less political risk here actually if we do go over the cliff and figure out a solution very quickly afterwards. if you go back to what happened with plan b, speaker boehner could not get, get that through his caucus in the house simply because you have many republican members sitting in very conservative districts who would absolutely not vet for anything that could put them at risk of a primary challenge in a year from now. frankly, for a lot of those members, voting for plan
family had learned to stop talking about the election, or stop talking altogether, we get another awkward announcement. this time it's tag romney. the oldest of the five romney boys that tells the "boston globe" that his father never wanted to be president that much anyway. funny thing is most of the voters felt the same way. let's bring in jonathan capehart and susan delpersio. i've got to start with you, sorry girl. here's what tag romney tells the "boston globe" about his dad. quote, he wanted to be president less than anyone i've met in my life. he had no desire to run. he would have been ecstatic to step aside. as a republican, you must be thrilled to hear that. no? >> i think this quote -- as a strategist i think this falls on the category of when family members and friends try to help and make a story look better in which case it kind of backfires. because the truth is you don't do what mitt romney did. he's run for governor, he's run before. you don't do this unless you wanted it more than anything else. however, if it was really the case and he needed to be persuaded to run, that
him even further. he still needs to be elected speaker on january 3rd. if you're boehner, you let this thing slide past january 3rd, getting yourself elected, and then do what you have to do. >> will he be stronger in. >> he won't be stronger. there will be about eight more democrats. >> really it's his caucus. >> but he'll be speaker again. if it does it, then you have a couple days to consider -- if he gets reelected and is speaker again, then it's much more trouble to unseed somebody who is already sitting there as the speaker than it is to stop him from running in the first place. >> if i could add to what ryan is saying, the only thing is he'll be proposing to his caucus a tax cut. everybody changes on january 3rd. you're no longer talking about some people getting a tax increase. harry reid and john boehner for instance said -- the speaker saying the senate should take it up. harry reid is speaking on the floor. let's take a listen. >> because americans' taxes are approaching the wrong direction come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have toda
say more things are on the table than were before the election. the pessimist would say yeah, but there still isn't the substance of an agreement. >> the mechanics, i mean, what we have -- on the obama side, you have an election that pretty much, you know, they took as a mandate, if you will, where, you know, the very issue of taxes was sort of legislative, and the americans basically said they agreed with the president, saying that taxes need to rise on the wealthy. and then you have the right wing of the republican party who won also by wide margins in many deeply conservative districts. and they think they have a mandate. so in a way, it's like the two mandates are canceling each other out. they each think that they are -- and that is why we're frozen. i don't know if it's been that way -- i don't know if the mechanics have been such that it has been so polarized to the point where it's been paralyzing. >> where they feel like they've each won. >> it doesn't baffle me, it sort of angers me is that the conservative republicans who won by overwhelming margins in their distri
's very clear now, mr. president, that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3rd. the house is not even here. he's told me he'll give them two days to get back here, 48 hours, not two days, 48 hours. they don't even have enough of the leadership here to meet to talk about it. they've done it with conference calls. people are spread all over this country because the speaker is basically waiting for january 3rd. now, the president campaigned on raising taxes on people making more than $250 thou,000 a year. the bush tax cut will expire at the end of this year. obama was elected with a surplus of about three million votes. he won the election. he campaigned on this issue. again, the speaker can't take yes for an answer. the president has presented to him something that would prevent us from going over the cliff. it was response to something that the speaker gave them himself but i guess with the dysfunctional republican caucus in the house, even the speaker can't tell what they are going to do because he backed off even his own proposal. the house, we hear so ofte
turning point for republic i had dans thought he lost that election because he went back on that pledge and raise taxes. will you get anyone in the house to raise taxes at all? >> you make a great point that republicans have kind of their party identity has evolved that they are very consistent on this tax issue and have been since that episode in the '90s, but what you are missing i think is that conservatives are not -- they haven't arrived at a consensus position that this actually would be raising taxes. some of them do, some will vote against this, grover norquist says boehner's plan b wouldn't raise taxes. under current law, the rates are set to go up. >> we'll talk to you again, soon, i'm sure, even if it's not that soon it will be in february or march when we have to revisit this all over again. gentlemen, thank you so much. >> take care. >>> a new here no our viewers, you don't want to miss "meet the press," david gregory sitting down with president obama. check local listings for "meet the press" tomorrow morning. >>> turn to weather now. another winter storm. marching north,
he has been asking for since the election. the only thing that will have changed is what the republicans are tired of fighting him or not. as of right now, there is no indication that they are tired. they go into next year with a stronger position for the things they want, personal because they have the leverage of the debt ceiling coming up, second of all, they will be able to vote for tax cuts next year. once you you have the tax increases go into effect, at that point, cbo and everybody starts going from higher revenue. the republicans will be voting for a tax cut, even if they don't come down to levels where they are right now. they get the chance to vote for that, which is a lot more palatable. heather: that is what a lot of people at home are wondering. they can't reach an agreement now. we have been talking about this forever. the end of the line, time is up, we still haven't reached an agreement. what we believe that they would've been able to reach an agreement retroactively? >> congress is supposed to work well under the deadline. even if some of the fights we h
from our elected leaders on both sides. this is not a problem that has come up randomly. we were facing this for a long time. many months. there seems to be a wisdom amongst a lot of people in washington that okay, we didn't go over the cliff and it's not a big deal. the treasury can take care of this problem january 3rd and january 4th. the question is how will the markets react? we do not know. people can pontificate all they want. we have a huge drop and people short sell. we don't know that. it is surprising that the house representative is not even scheduled to be in. they are working on a foreign intelligence bill. we are not really moving in and the president doesn't come back tomorrow morning. we are not moving towards an agreement that conversations are not as fluid as they once were last week. kind of scary and daunting in a country where we are still very much coming out of a recession. >> nbc awe luke russert. thanks as always. we have the congressional editor at politico. to sort of pick up on the point, i see at least if you are on the democratic side. i see why they would
of our elected officials? but i want to ask that in a broad sense. you've followed politics for a long time. when you look at this from the outside and you're an average american, basically the media is saying, congress, if they don't do anything now, might as well pass something on january 3rd but in actuality they could pass today. do you think people are understanding how absurd it is? >> no. the american people understand how absurd this is. we've been seeing poll after poll after poll showing the american people, if the country goes over the cliff, would is to blame? the republicans get the majority of the blame. speaker boehner and his plan b could not even get the republicans in his caucus to pass a tax increase on people making $1 million when we already know through november election and through subsequent public opinion polls, the american people are perfectly fine with raising taxes on people earning incomes of $250,000 and above. so the idea that the republican party can't -- i mean, i should say speaker boehner can't get his caucus in line to do something that's for the be
. another new law changes the election cycle in baltimore city. elections will be held on the same cycle as the presidential election. it will soon be easier for veterans to prove they served. in the new year, the department of veterans affairs will be required to give them something to prove their status. the m.d.a. will have to include on their driver's licenses as long as they have proper identification. speaking of identification, a new law will make it easier to protect kids and disabled adults from identity theft. a parent or guardian will have a right to freeze their credit report. >> it won't be as fast for an adult because credit bureau s will want to make sure they have the right to freeze it. >> advocates for the law hope it protects foster children who are especially vulnerable. >> we're hoping the credit bureaus and department of human resources will get to data sharing so they can freeze them en masse or thaw them en masse. >> adults could already freeze their credit reports if they suspect they could be victims of identity theft but maryland is the first state in the count
. on november 4 before the election, you posted on facebook, "why would anyone jobless today vote to maintain the status quo instead of change? unemployment is still higher than four years ago." what are your thoughts on president obama's re-election, i would say to you? were you saying to people if you are jobless today the president has failinged you and you should vote against him and vote for change in the presidency? >> well, what i was saying was the old recovery -- mantra, to do the same thing over and over and over and expect different change is called insanity. we spent $2 billion on an election that nothing changed. same congress, same senate same president. so should we expect change? i'm not that sure. >> therefore the re-election of president obama was a good thing or bad thing you think? >> well, i don't ever get into politics as you know, charlie. i've always said i'm not right wing or left wing, i'm for the whole bird. >> evidently, god wanted president obama, he had a purpose for him, to be re-elected. do i follow that? what's the disconnect between those t
ma markey throwing his hat into the ring for kerry's senate seat. a special election would be held early this summer. markey a 66-year-old democrat is the first prominent candidate to declare for the race. >>> mom and pop shops across the country bracing for a labor fight that could cripple businesses. more on the key workers that could walk off the job coming up. consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. so, whether it's 10 years' of life's sunny days... or... the occasional stormy one... trust goes a long way. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to h
our elected officials a respectful but potent message. interesting way to do it. >> the problem with the starbucks, they'll cut a deal. >>> let's talk about sports, shall we? call him a bad quarterback but do not call him a bad teammate. tim tebow firing back after a report that said he asked to sit out some offensive plays on sunday after being snubbed for the jets starting quarterback job. espn says tebow was so upset with the perception that he quit on the team that it dampened his christmas. as for tebow, he will likely be out of new york by next year, headed to presumably the jacksonville jaguars, his home team. but you know what this is? world's smallest violin. you think i feel sorry for him? >> especially with $5 million after being traded from denver. come on, tim, you're terrible. >> oh! >> he's got a lot to say. >> back to the dinner topic right now. as we have told you, president obama lands in washington today, back from hawaii to take part in negotiations over the f is cal cliff, but it seems increasingly unlikely that we are going to have a plan that congress can
neighborhoods. supervisor avalos was elected to the board in november of 2008. we are going to get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome and thank you for joining us today. tell us a lot about your background, where you grew up, went to school, the job you worked. >> i was born in a town called and los angeles. it was a lot of working-class folks. my father was a shore worker, my mother was an office worker at usc. my parents were divorced when i was 10 years old, and i moved to the east coast for six years before going back to california after high school. i went to school at uc santa barbara, graduated in 19988 -- 1988. i have lived in the excelsior since 1999. i have had lots of different jobs, but my main job is doing social work force and a disco, i have been a community organizer, i worked at a labor organization supporting janitor's working in our high- rise buildings. i was a legislative aide before .wr. i got to see how it all work from the outside, community organizations supporting young people, children, families, working for labor, and saw how cit
before election, we saw chris christie go from being one of president obama's toughest critics, one of mitt romney's best surrogates to really putting the people of new jersey, his state, the disaster in the number one place, number one priority and worked with the local and federal authorities, embraced the help that was coming from everywhere, and that has seen him get really high approval ratings. you know, it's funnich sometimes doing the right thing is the politically correct thing to do. >> they say good policy is good politics, vice versa. would be nice if other people on both sides of the aisle followed that. okay, richard. i want to get to your next naughty because these are two republicans who gave republican leaders, the people here i cover, major, major heartburn, you see them there,ed to akin and richard mourdock. >> they became the problems the republicans were having in recapturing the senate. ed to akin, the republican senate candidate from missouri and richard mourdock from minnesota, made offensive remarks about women and rape and todd akin introduce the the concep
congress, after the election, politicians will be free to reason together. why should it be any different or any better in a new congress? >> what does it say about the state of our politics? that these elected officials, manufactured a crisis and can't get themselves out of the box that they constructed? >> what does it say? it says that we don't have just an ideological divide. we have a crisis of self-government right now. to be real clear about it. this is a time bomb that congress set. nobody wants to see frustration cuts. but that's the stick they put to their own head as a way of compelling a deal to get done. and a deal doesn't get done. we're not even aiming for the grand bargain that is necessary to reduce long-term deficits and debt. we're going to get a patch and be here again in two months. congress can't get out of its own way. we keep setting our own traps. >> john, we appreciate the clarity, even if it's depressing. thank you very much. >>> a lot of other news developing overnight. for that, let's check in, as always, with mr. ron claiborne. >> hi, dan, bianna. we begin in
are very, very clear throughout this election and in polling as well. do not cut social security, medicare and medicaid. you have the situation with republicans saying hey, we don't think billionaires should pay a nickel more in taxes, but we think there should be cuts in programs impacting working families who are already hurting. that's the problem we have. >> let's talk about one of the programs, unemployment insurance. it seems that the administration believes that it is very much a catalyst for growth and has a stimulating effect. house republicans would probably never bring it up as a freestanding bill, but it's not part of some large scale or small scale agreement now. how much do you think unemployment will be part of a final deal. will it have to be part of a deal to get your support? >> absolutely. we are in the midst of this recession and real terms, almost 15% of our people are unemployed or underemployed. you take a look at that unemployment check for people who are looking at it, it will cause real suffering for families. it is an economic stimulus. you put money into the han
six-party partners. i would like to take this opportunity to sincerely congratulate president-elect park for her victory in south koreaest's hard-fought presidential election. the republic of korea is one of our nation's closest friends in asia. ours is a steadfast alliance forged in the crucible of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping
elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. legislatively. things moved on. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could
much of a deficit. >> worry me this question. can you get elected if you say i am going to cut this and cut that unless money flows out. can you get elected f. you reform social security can you get elect medicare or medicaid. you can get elected. i will reform. post office. you can't get elected. >> kelly: you can't take it back. >> once you made the promise to pay how do you with draw. >> clayton: but you can get elected raising taxes. interpeffort the last election. >> julia: we didn't say your name at the beginning of the segment. >> clayton: he doesn't even need an bruction. he's so good. >> julia: this is your guy when you talk about fiscal cliff. >> i am guy with the accent. >> clayton: tune in fox business network . no one does it better stewart varney. ualjullove to your family and beautiful children. >> clayton: teachers trainn to use handgun to protect the school. we report and you decide. julaloha, hawaii. president is heading back to washington. is it too late to avoid the fiscal cliff. you can't answer it because you are leaving now. we'll talk about this next.
into the ring in kerry becomes secretary of state, which is expected, a special election will be held early this summer. markey is the first prominent candidate to declare for the race. >>> love this story. paying it forward by paying it backward. a story of rampant generosity and good will in canada happening in winnipeg. one customer pulled up to a coffee shop drive through in winnipeg and paid for the person behind them. the next person did the same and on and on and on. 228 customers in all. >> you hear the shout from drive through. my manager, todd, there. hear him screaming out random numbers, 147. pumped up. filled the building with excitement. >> now it's such a habit started here and people come back to this one, knowing it's either going to be your day, you will start it, and it will come back, a huge cycle. >> no one knows who started the chain or who ended it. do you want to be the person that ends that chain? >> i will tell you, all i do every time i go back to canada is go to tim horton's, a national institute. just great. >> look who we have here. do you have a note from the
's presidential elections coming up in iran if you're a middle easterner, what do you do when it's campaign time? you pick fights with israel. >> clayton: and see that continue all year with the u.s. involvement there? >> it's going to have to. because israelis say iran has to have the program delayed by mid summertime. >> clayton: number two? >> there's no good option because you have assad the dictator butchering his people and rebels that are fighting him. they're not controlling what's happening on the ground, that's al-qaeda and the muslim brotherhood so the bloodshed as horrifying as it is now, wait till you see what happens. >> clayton: what about u.s. involvement in syria? there's been hand wringing whether we should get involved as in libya. i know there's movement to try to arm certain great news in syria, are we confident that's going in the right direction? >> no, because we've outsourced a lot of our role to countries like turkey and qatar and just like libya when you give them support on our behalf they support the islamists the people that we don't want to take over syria, without
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